A psycho-spiritual journey in peace, vitality, resilience, and faith.

Where do I go from here?

Musings on a well intented life

Sweet feet visiting me before bed…❤️

Posted 1 day ago
<p>The repetitive, regular tendencies or practices in daily
functioning, those often eliciting our involuntary participation, are known as
habits. They become an integral part of our lives as helpful, as well as limiting,
entrenchments; the self-care habits that support the health of our physical
form stand alongside the pesky, self-sabotage of stress-induced or reactive
patterns that become the hard-to-relinquish ruts of daily life.</p><p>Habits manifest in all shapes and sizes and are often
thought of as an observable behavior. Frequently, our existing habits occur
automatically without our consistent or conscious participation, mostly because
we lose the need for active focus. Take driving, for example. Once we learn to
drive, the methodical thinking through every step to execute the mechanics of
operating our vehicle becomes unnecessary. It just organically happens because
a habit was formed.</p><!-- more --><p>We all have habits of various purpose, creation, and
strength – some, borne out of a need for safety, others devised for ease,
efficiency, or to fulfill rules or norms. Brushing and washing, for example,
live alongside cleaning our room and tidying our home, as well as the larger
community care of recycling and maintaining our dwellings and/or properties. Kept
in balance, these habits serve to honor our physical temple and proverbial
home. Both witness the Divinity within us and all things by loving ourselves, others,
and Mother Earth. </p><p>As we move beyond our perfunctory and reflexive world to engage
in self-reflection, personal growth, and spiritual development, the life of
many habits comes to the fore. Some may be easily seen, while others remain an
elusive part of our day-to-day operations and reactions and are a bit trickier
to detect. Many have their roots in thought or emotional patterns, like the
knee-jerk reaction to a perceived negative comment or our slide into
self-criticism when we feel we’ve done something wrong. </p><p>Taking a closer look at the vast array of habits in our
life, their origin is one aspect all hold in common; we can trace our habits’
literal birth from the womb of our beliefs – a belief about ourselves and/or
our world. Returning to driving, for example, the proverbial fuel for this American
activity lies in the belief in independence, a teenage rite of passage and an alignment
with societal norms. Looking deeper into the habits within habits, we might also
discover nervous navigation, road rage, or a compulsion to speed fed by
corresponding beliefs in danger, others’ wrongdoing, or hurrying through life. </p><p>So how can we work with the habits we’ve developed, especially
addressing those that don’t serve our highest good? Traveling on the road to
discovery and change, we can free ourselves from old habits through examination
and relinquishment. Other interventions require intentional re-patterning. Calling,
for example, on the Japanese practice of <a><i>datsuzoku</i></a> – the freedom from habit,
daily routine, or the ordinary – opens us to the new by transcending convention
and our personal ruts. Applied, it is the choice to “do something differently”,
to break the steps of our routine, or think out of the box in an innovative way
and move past our typical ways of operating.</p><p>Working at a deeper level we can examine the belief that
created our habit in the first place, asking if the habit serves us or we’re
serving it. As beliefs that find voice through the patterns of our limiting
attitudes become discovered, we can intentionally allow them to fall away because
we see how they block us from living freely in alignment with our True Nature. And
while releasing these kinds of beliefs moves us forward on our path, the accompanying
patterns and habits often remain scored into our psyche like a well-traveled
hiking trail until we re-pattern or completely release them, too. In other
words, as we liberate ourselves from constraining beliefs, it’s often the
habits and patterns that remain intact to plague us, feeling as if they pull
our mind and heart back to the ways we left behind, though not nearly as
potently as when the attached belief remains active. As we invest energy into
new, healthy behaviors instead of our outdated habits, the heavily worn trail
of these entrenched neural patterns grows grass again to blend once more with
the mossy forest floor of our psyche. Removing all energy from old habits or
merely acknowledging any diversion as a tug in the “old direction”, we also practice
<i>datsuzoku</i> to move forward on new and
exciting paths.</p><p>Changing habits, because of their nature and ours, often
feels challenging and uncomfortable. But know that discomfort serves as a
marker to demonstrate our progress, a sign that we are just where we need to be,
even in the midst of change. So hang in there! Remember that habits take
approximately eighteen months to form, so their dissolution and/or
re-patterning takes time, too.</p><p>Listed below is a partial inventory of
behavioral, thought, and emotional habits. Those that appear helpful,
sustaining, or growth-enhancing remain alongside those that may not serve our
highest good. While incomplete, this list shines first light on that which we
tend to ignore or do automatically, demonstrating that nearly any behavior,
thought pattern, or emotional recurrence may indicate a habit needing our
conscious attention. Because we tend to categorically label patterns or habits
as “good” or “bad” influenced by our judgment-driven world, in the journeys to
come, let’s broaden our scope and instead consider how each habit may be
serving our highest good. Are they growth-promoting, health-based patterns,
which demonstrate our self-love? Or are they a call to examine what is
unhealthy or inhibiting – a notification to shed light on the work yet to be
done? For a deeper look, we revisit this topic in Letting
Go in Volume
IV. </p><p>Here lies the opportunity to witness whatever the Universe
calls us to observe, re-balance, or shed to be the master of our world, lovingly
caring for ourselves on this big, beautiful rock floating in an infinite sky. </p><p>Healthy
  eating</p><p>Word
  choice</p><p>Emotional
  self-care</p><p>Caffeine
  addiction</p><p>Swearing</p><p>Staying
  centered</p><p>Praying</p><p>“Seeing”
  a silver lining</p><p>Loving
  attitude</p><p>Meditating</p><p>Positive
  thinking</p><p>Reacting
  dramatically</p><p>Driving
  a car</p><p>Assuming
  “bad” outcomes</p><p>Consistent
  irritation</p><p>Good
  hygiene</p><p>Being
  bossy</p><p>Feeling
  inferior</p><p>Deep
  breathing</p><p>Looking
  for “the culprit”</p><p>Blaming
  others</p><p>Smoking</p><p>Complaining</p><p>Worrying</p><p>Hurrying</p><p>Apologizing</p><p>Defaulting
  to frustration</p><p>Physically
  isolating</p><p>Overly
  independent</p><p>Shutting
  down</p><p>Nail
  biting</p><p>Needing
  to be right</p><p>Nervousness</p><p>Nose
  picking</p><p>Poor
  hygiene</p><p>Sadness</p><p>Scratching/picking
  skin</p><p>Feeling
  superior</p><p>Perfectionism</p><p>Doing,
  doing, doing</p><p>Cleaning</p><p>Feeling
  victimized</p><p>For journaling exercises linked to this chapter purchase Volume I of The Soul-Discovery Journalbook Series by visiting <a href="http://www.pathways2innerpeace.com">www.pathways2innerpeace.com</a>.  </p><p>Happy Journaling!</p>

The repetitive, regular tendencies or practices in daily functioning, those often eliciting our involuntary participation, are known as habits. They become an integral part of our lives as helpful, as well as limiting, entrenchments; the self-care habits that support the health of our physical form stand alongside the pesky, self-sabotage of stress-induced or reactive patterns that become the hard-to-relinquish ruts of daily life.

Habits manifest in all shapes and sizes and are often thought of as an observable behavior. Frequently, our existing habits occur automatically without our consistent or conscious participation, mostly because we lose the need for active focus. Take driving, for example. Once we learn to drive, the methodical thinking through every step to execute the mechanics of operating our vehicle becomes unnecessary. It just organically happens because a habit was formed.

We all have habits of various purpose, creation, and strength – some, borne out of a need for safety, others devised for ease, efficiency, or to fulfill rules or norms. Brushing and washing, for example, live alongside cleaning our room and tidying our home, as well as the larger community care of recycling and maintaining our dwellings and/or properties. Kept in balance, these habits serve to honor our physical temple and proverbial home. Both witness the Divinity within us and all things by loving ourselves, others, and Mother Earth.

As we move beyond our perfunctory and reflexive world to engage in self-reflection, personal growth, and spiritual development, the life of many habits comes to the fore. Some may be easily seen, while others remain an elusive part of our day-to-day operations and reactions and are a bit trickier to detect. Many have their roots in thought or emotional patterns, like the knee-jerk reaction to a perceived negative comment or our slide into self-criticism when we feel we’ve done something wrong.

Taking a closer look at the vast array of habits in our life, their origin is one aspect all hold in common; we can trace our habits’ literal birth from the womb of our beliefs – a belief about ourselves and/or our world. Returning to driving, for example, the proverbial fuel for this American activity lies in the belief in independence, a teenage rite of passage and an alignment with societal norms. Looking deeper into the habits within habits, we might also discover nervous navigation, road rage, or a compulsion to speed fed by corresponding beliefs in danger, others’ wrongdoing, or hurrying through life.

So how can we work with the habits we’ve developed, especially addressing those that don’t serve our highest good? Traveling on the road to discovery and change, we can free ourselves from old habits through examination and relinquishment. Other interventions require intentional re-patterning. Calling, for example, on the Japanese practice of datsuzoku – the freedom from habit, daily routine, or the ordinary – opens us to the new by transcending convention and our personal ruts. Applied, it is the choice to “do something differently”, to break the steps of our routine, or think out of the box in an innovative way and move past our typical ways of operating.

Working at a deeper level we can examine the belief that created our habit in the first place, asking if the habit serves us or we’re serving it. As beliefs that find voice through the patterns of our limiting attitudes become discovered, we can intentionally allow them to fall away because we see how they block us from living freely in alignment with our True Nature. And while releasing these kinds of beliefs moves us forward on our path, the accompanying patterns and habits often remain scored into our psyche like a well-traveled hiking trail until we re-pattern or completely release them, too. In other words, as we liberate ourselves from constraining beliefs, it’s often the habits and patterns that remain intact to plague us, feeling as if they pull our mind and heart back to the ways we left behind, though not nearly as potently as when the attached belief remains active. As we invest energy into new, healthy behaviors instead of our outdated habits, the heavily worn trail of these entrenched neural patterns grows grass again to blend once more with the mossy forest floor of our psyche. Removing all energy from old habits or merely acknowledging any diversion as a tug in the “old direction”, we also practice datsuzoku to move forward on new and exciting paths.

Changing habits, because of their nature and ours, often feels challenging and uncomfortable. But know that discomfort serves as a marker to demonstrate our progress, a sign that we are just where we need to be, even in the midst of change. So hang in there! Remember that habits take approximately eighteen months to form, so their dissolution and/or re-patterning takes time, too.

Listed below is a partial inventory of behavioral, thought, and emotional habits. Those that appear helpful, sustaining, or growth-enhancing remain alongside those that may not serve our highest good. While incomplete, this list shines first light on that which we tend to ignore or do automatically, demonstrating that nearly any behavior, thought pattern, or emotional recurrence may indicate a habit needing our conscious attention. Because we tend to categorically label patterns or habits as “good” or “bad” influenced by our judgment-driven world, in the journeys to come, let’s broaden our scope and instead consider how each habit may be serving our highest good. Are they growth-promoting, health-based patterns, which demonstrate our self-love? Or are they a call to examine what is unhealthy or inhibiting – a notification to shed light on the work yet to be done? For a deeper look, we revisit this topic in Letting Go in Volume IV.

Here lies the opportunity to witness whatever the Universe calls us to observe, re-balance, or shed to be the master of our world, lovingly caring for ourselves on this big, beautiful rock floating in an infinite sky.

Healthy  eating

Word  choice

Emotional  self-care

Caffeine  addiction

Swearing

Staying  centered

Praying

“Seeing”  a silver lining

Loving  attitude

Meditating

Positive  thinking

Reacting  dramatically

Driving  a car

Assuming  “bad” outcomes

Consistent  irritation

Good  hygiene

Being  bossy

Feeling  inferior

Deep  breathing

Looking  for “the culprit”

Blaming  others

Smoking

Complaining

Worrying

Hurrying

Apologizing

Defaulting  to frustration

Physically  isolating

Overly  independent

Shutting  down

Nail  biting

Needing  to be right

Nervousness

Nose  picking

Poor  hygiene

Sadness

Scratching/picking  skin

Feeling  superior

Perfectionism

Doing,  doing, doing

Cleaning

Feeling  victimized

For journaling exercises linked to this chapter purchase Volume I of The Soul-Discovery Journalbook Series by visiting www.pathways2innerpeace.com.  

Happy Journaling!

Posted 3 weeks ago
<h2><a href="https://mailchi.mp/570ca135269c/november-newsletter-2018">

The Rescuer’s Quest:Exploring Our Drive to Help Others</a></h2>As we sit on the heels of a national election, I decided to dodge the temptation to write yet another post about navigating the mire. Instead, I’ve been inspired to talk about a topic that many may find related - our drive to help others.<br/>     Many of us in the healing arts have a magnetic pull to be of help and assist. The vision of seeing/feeling a sentient being suffer, a vision that occurs through our perceptions, can be uncomfortable to say the very least, especially for us empathic folks. That’s not to say that what we witness around us - in our family, our community, or our world - isn’t a call for help. War-torn countries, people racked with famine, homelessness, animals not cared for all exude a level of pain and strife that is difficult to see. We want others happy, healthy, and thriving. Yes?<br/>    The great volume of others’ challenges can overwhelm many of us, pulling our heartstrings to ways of helping, consoling, nurturing, and serving. And without this kind of generosity, no doubt, many more may fall into deeper despair and hopelessness. These are the earth angels that donate their time, resources, homes, loving energies, and talents.<br/>    If you find yourself in this group, good for you! The world needs your help. Here’s my cautionary note, however. Many helpers, in fact, are rescuers - individuals driven to save the world one person, animal, or plant at a time. Driven is the operative word here…think compulsion and need. As a recovering rescuer, trust me when I say that I know the need (born from my own trauma) to help others out of their pain, especially those with emotional turmoil. <br/>     The big challenge of helpers who operate as rescuers is a mindset predicated on the belief of “I’m OK. You’re not OK.” in alignment with the Drama Triangle of Dr. Karpman. Through this role of Rescuer, others are seen as needy, incapable, challenged, at risk, etc. As such, Rescuers attract more responsibility and people in crisis - those lacking maturity or skills to manage their lives. Rescuers often feel the need to put out fires, manage problems, and heap onto their plates more than what is mentally/emotionally/physically healthy, which results often in feeling depleted, unnurtured, and stressed. If this is sounding like you…read on.<br/>     So how might we illuminate this pattern in us and the drama it creates in our life? The first step, as always, is to identify how we operate in our lives, making what is subconscious conscious, and bring it fully into our awareness. Here’s a few questions that may help:<p><br/> 1. Do you feel the need to solve others’ problems?<br/>2. Do you attract people or animals who need you because they’re dependent, crisis-oriented, sickly, overwhelmed with drama, or have difficulty function in the world/life?<br/>3. Do you feel highly responsible for others (especially those who by age and functioning could be doing more for themselves) or tend to dive right into people’s problems?<br/>4. Do you pile more and more responsibilities on your plate? Do you have difficulty asking for help?<br/>5. Do you experience fear at the thought of a person in your life managing their own challenges without you?<br/>6. What do you gain from rescuing others - a sense of accomplishment, relief of your own anxiety/grief, etc?<br/>7. What do you fear losing if you stop worrying, managing, and over helping?<br/>8. What fear might rescuing another alleviate in you?<br/>     One very important reflection that helps us recognize our rescuing tendencies is to identify the feelings/thoughts in ourselves that become side-stepped because we’ve jumped into over-functioning/rescuer mode to help others, ignoring their innate skills and the opportunities they manifested to grow. Many times, our disproportional focus on others’ problems alleviate the stress and/or pain we need to heal in our own lives. In the words of Greek playwright Aeschylus:</p><p><br/><i>                                                 Medice, cura te ipsum.</i><br/>                                                 Physician, heal thyself.</p><p><br/> Many Blessings,<br/>Adriene<br/><br/><br/></p>

The Rescuer’s Quest:Exploring Our Drive to Help Others

As we sit on the heels of a national election, I decided to dodge the temptation to write yet another post about navigating the mire. Instead, I’ve been inspired to talk about a topic that many may find related - our drive to help others.
    Many of us in the healing arts have a magnetic pull to be of help and assist. The vision of seeing/feeling a sentient being suffer, a vision that occurs through our perceptions, can be uncomfortable to say the very least, especially for us empathic folks. That’s not to say that what we witness around us - in our family, our community, or our world - isn’t a call for help. War-torn countries, people racked with famine, homelessness, animals not cared for all exude a level of pain and strife that is difficult to see. We want others happy, healthy, and thriving. Yes?
   The great volume of others’ challenges can overwhelm many of us, pulling our heartstrings to ways of helping, consoling, nurturing, and serving. And without this kind of generosity, no doubt, many more may fall into deeper despair and hopelessness. These are the earth angels that donate their time, resources, homes, loving energies, and talents.
   If you find yourself in this group, good for you! The world needs your help. Here’s my cautionary note, however. Many helpers, in fact, are rescuers - individuals driven to save the world one person, animal, or plant at a time. Driven is the operative word here…think compulsion and need. As a recovering rescuer, trust me when I say that I know the need (born from my own trauma) to help others out of their pain, especially those with emotional turmoil.
    The big challenge of helpers who operate as rescuers is a mindset predicated on the belief of “I’m OK. You’re not OK.” in alignment with the Drama Triangle of Dr. Karpman. Through this role of Rescuer, others are seen as needy, incapable, challenged, at risk, etc. As such, Rescuers attract more responsibility and people in crisis - those lacking maturity or skills to manage their lives. Rescuers often feel the need to put out fires, manage problems, and heap onto their plates more than what is mentally/emotionally/physically healthy, which results often in feeling depleted, unnurtured, and stressed. If this is sounding like you…read on.
    So how might we illuminate this pattern in us and the drama it creates in our life? The first step, as always, is to identify how we operate in our lives, making what is subconscious conscious, and bring it fully into our awareness. Here’s a few questions that may help:


1. Do you feel the need to solve others’ problems?
2. Do you attract people or animals who need you because they’re dependent, crisis-oriented, sickly, overwhelmed with drama, or have difficulty function in the world/life?
3. Do you feel highly responsible for others (especially those who by age and functioning could be doing more for themselves) or tend to dive right into people’s problems?
4. Do you pile more and more responsibilities on your plate? Do you have difficulty asking for help?
5. Do you experience fear at the thought of a person in your life managing their own challenges without you?
6. What do you gain from rescuing others - a sense of accomplishment, relief of your own anxiety/grief, etc?
7. What do you fear losing if you stop worrying, managing, and over helping?
8. What fear might rescuing another alleviate in you?
    One very important reflection that helps us recognize our rescuing tendencies is to identify the feelings/thoughts in ourselves that become side-stepped because we’ve jumped into over-functioning/rescuer mode to help others, ignoring their innate skills and the opportunities they manifested to grow. Many times, our disproportional focus on others’ problems alleviate the stress and/or pain we need to heal in our own lives. In the words of Greek playwright Aeschylus:


                                                 Medice, cura te ipsum.
                                                 Physician, heal thyself.


Many Blessings,
Adriene


Posted 4 weeks ago
<p>Historically, we think of arrogance as a sign that a particular someone is disdainfully self-assured, feeling “better than” their peers or others. This has always been my view of arrogance, too, seeing it as an imaginary step up the ladder of self opinions. Arrogance marks a feeling of conceit, an overly confident air, egotism, or attitude that feeds a sense of superiority. It’s not pretty and we all can fall prey to it.</p><p>What if, however, a counter-part to the arrogance we know exists, a sibling hidden behind insecurity. Perhaps it’s even the real face of arrogance? What I’m suggesting is a state that I’ve termed<i> paradoxical arrogance</i> - the harbinger of low self-esteem and self-deprecation marked by self-beating, self-criticism, and unreasonable expectations. Paradoxical arrogance is the “better than” attitude our ego mind presses us with when we don’t perform to its standards. It’s the critical internal voice that says, “We shouldn’t have made a mistake,” taking our inner child to task and berating them for a perceived wrongdoing. Paradoxical arrogance is the superiority of our ego mind against the rest of the self - the idea that we, somehow, should be beyond mistakes, bloopers, or mishaps instead of living with the humility to realize that we’re human, accepting that humans make mistakes.</p><p>Paradoxical arrogance is first, then, an internal process; the same one that our ego can carry into the world armed with sharpened, perfectionist-driven bows and arrow to slay our co-workers, neighbors, or partners, because it uncomfortably witnesses the same traits in others. As we take our paradoxical sibling into our relationships, we become critical or arrogant outwardly.</p><p>So, the next time we turn on ourselves, diminish our choices, or feel lesser-than because we “should have known otherwise,” tell that arrogant ego voice to  #$%* off. Be mindful of its high and mighty air and drop it off at the sewage treatment plant. Our self-esteem doesn’t improve by participating in paradoxical arrogance, self-beatings, or judgement. It does respond to taking risks, changing our behavior, and choosing to be more gentle with ourselves and others.</p>

Historically, we think of arrogance as a sign that a particular someone is disdainfully self-assured, feeling “better than” their peers or others. This has always been my view of arrogance, too, seeing it as an imaginary step up the ladder of self opinions. Arrogance marks a feeling of conceit, an overly confident air, egotism, or attitude that feeds a sense of superiority. It’s not pretty and we all can fall prey to it.

What if, however, a counter-part to the arrogance we know exists, a sibling hidden behind insecurity. Perhaps it’s even the real face of arrogance? What I’m suggesting is a state that I’ve termed paradoxical arrogance - the harbinger of low self-esteem and self-deprecation marked by self-beating, self-criticism, and unreasonable expectations. Paradoxical arrogance is the “better than” attitude our ego mind presses us with when we don’t perform to its standards. It’s the critical internal voice that says, “We shouldn’t have made a mistake,” taking our inner child to task and berating them for a perceived wrongdoing. Paradoxical arrogance is the superiority of our ego mind against the rest of the self - the idea that we, somehow, should be beyond mistakes, bloopers, or mishaps instead of living with the humility to realize that we’re human, accepting that humans make mistakes.

Paradoxical arrogance is first, then, an internal process; the same one that our ego can carry into the world armed with sharpened, perfectionist-driven bows and arrow to slay our co-workers, neighbors, or partners, because it uncomfortably witnesses the same traits in others. As we take our paradoxical sibling into our relationships, we become critical or arrogant outwardly.

So, the next time we turn on ourselves, diminish our choices, or feel lesser-than because we “should have known otherwise,” tell that arrogant ego voice to  #$%* off. Be mindful of its high and mighty air and drop it off at the sewage treatment plant. Our self-esteem doesn’t improve by participating in paradoxical arrogance, self-beatings, or judgement. It does respond to taking risks, changing our behavior, and choosing to be more gentle with ourselves and others.

Posted 4 weeks ago
<p>Energy follows intent and your aura is a projection of your personal spiritual energy molded by your intent. </p>

<p>“Our [energy] field is created a combination of our pure Spirit energy AND what we contribute to the field through interaction with “our world” (as the who, what, and where of our personal universe) through our inner climate (beliefs, reactions, attitudes, thoughts, emotions, and feelings).”</p>

<p>What shape is your aura? What are you creating and putting in your world today? <br/>
#thesouldiscoveryjournalbook #awareness #aura #innerwork #spiritualdevelopment #bookquotes #higherconsciousness #journaling #bookstagram #bethebestyou <br/>
<a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BqC--0WniMj/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=wzunegmd2mjp">https://www.instagram.com/p/BqC–0WniMj/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=wzunegmd2mjp</a></p>

Energy follows intent and your aura is a projection of your personal spiritual energy molded by your intent.

“Our [energy] field is created a combination of our pure Spirit energy AND what we contribute to the field through interaction with “our world” (as the who, what, and where of our personal universe) through our inner climate (beliefs, reactions, attitudes, thoughts, emotions, and feelings).”

What shape is your aura? What are you creating and putting in your world today?
#thesouldiscoveryjournalbook #awareness #aura #innerwork #spiritualdevelopment #bookquotes #higherconsciousness #journaling #bookstagram #bethebestyou
https://www.instagram.com/p/BqC–0WniMj/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=wzunegmd2mjp

Posted 14 weeks ago
<p>The choices appear to be many in this plane. In truth, though, are simply either aligned with our Higher Self or ego. #thesouldiscoveryjournalbook #chooselove #higherself #soul #healing #higherconsciousness #doingthework<br/>
<a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo9wF1AAMnY/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=1x1qbcjalis13">https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo9wF1AAMnY/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=1x1qbcjalis13</a></p>

The choices appear to be many in this plane. In truth, though, are simply either aligned with our Higher Self or ego. #thesouldiscoveryjournalbook #chooselove #higherself #soul #healing #higherconsciousness #doingthework
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bo9wF1AAMnY/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=1x1qbcjalis13

Posted 18 weeks ago

Standing in Our Power

Seeing the Ford/Kavanaugh hearing on the news and catching glimpses of media feeds have given me great pause. I have no doubt that many of you have felt the fear and outrage in the ethers and experienced your own roller coaster of thoughts and emotions. This past week has certainly given me many opportunities to practice everything I’ve been taught.

The path of sexual assault in all its forms is fraught with heartache and one that so many of us have walked. Thankfully these events are unifying individuals and sparking various group movements as people ban together. Others look forward to the future, to insure a that the representatives for the people embody the very character we seek when presiding over the highest court in the land. Certainly, the topic is up close and personal now, being talked about finally in a very open forum.

If you found the shock waves (your own or others) shaking you -reliving old traumas, feeling powerless, or fear of the sense of injustice - you’re not alone. Assault hotlines have exploded and women are coming forward in hoards to speak up - some for the first time, others with a renewed sense of hope that they will be heard.

So what do we do with the thoughts and feelings these recent events may have stirred in us? My answer…don’t ignore them. If we’ve experienced assault or molestation, emotionally charged remnants in our psyche will likely have resurfaced showing us unhealed parts that call for resolution. As painful as this is, it presents an opportunity to find closure, healing, and peace from the trauma. We must remember though, even if we didn’t experience similar events to Dr. Ford, old boundary violations, not being heard, being mocked while in pain, or any number of old situations could claw their way to the surface of our consciousness as we become triggered again by what we witness on the news, in other people’s stories, or in the deluge of media information. Whatever the case, it calls for self-care - kindness to ourselves, seeking support and guidance, and even reaching out for counseling or therapy to bring our own turmoil to a close through healing.

I’m certain we can all see that in the shadow of our current political and social climate, anger and outrage is more and more commonplace. It’s reached a fever pitch as people, especially women, step forward refusing to be mistreated and ignored in their pain. The old urges and/or messages to deny our frustration or swallow the screams of our inner child who needs to be heard will no longer be tolerated - a powerful outcome of our evolution.

Anger is a powerful motivator, one that can move us forward on our path when used with discernment. It can help us out of abusive situations, urge us to set boundaries, and burn away the feelings of injustice. Anger, however, is not where we want to stay because it becomes a corrosive demon, eating us alive from the inside out if left untended.

In navigating these times, honoring where we are is necessary, as necessary as raising our consciousness past all the chaos into a state where we can see beyond appearances. This remains a challenging task when we are hurting. However, when we use whatever lies in front of us or what surfaces in us as an opportunity to heal, we get more adept at getting up and out of the surrounding chaos to stay centered. The more we address our pain and shed it, the more we learn to come from a place of power and not force, two states of consciousness often confused for the other.

What is power and what does it look like? From the teachers of Sacred Garden Fellowship, power is a deep, velvet-covered inner knowing - soft, compassionate, clear, and centered. During the hearing Dr. Ford was a vision of a woman in her power - knowing who she is, speaking with clarity and kindness, owning her space, and standing strong in the den of opposition and mistrust. Through true power, soft and compassionate remain intimately bound with strength and conviction. True power doesn’t scream or demand. It executes with precision and clarity. It flows like water, filling the space where it’s poured, strong and soft. Grain by grain, true power washes the hard, unyielding stones of ignorance and injustice until nothing is left but sand.


Be kind to yourselves, nurture your inner child, and stand together in love.


Blessings,

Adriene

Posted 19 weeks ago

Posted 19 weeks ago
<p>Looking at our values helps us grow as we take the time and space to explore what doesn’t serve our highest good and authentically shed it. “Like a beacon that illuminates our ways of being, shining a light on our values offers more opportunities for growth.” #thesouldiscoveryjournalbook #grow #lookinside #attitude #values #healing #bookstagram #journaling #bookquotes #evolve #higherconsciousness #bethebestyou <br/>
<a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BoeU10bAjcG/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=1f66dva874tyx">https://www.instagram.com/p/BoeU10bAjcG/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=1f66dva874tyx</a></p>

Looking at our values helps us grow as we take the time and space to explore what doesn’t serve our highest good and authentically shed it. “Like a beacon that illuminates our ways of being, shining a light on our values offers more opportunities for growth.” #thesouldiscoveryjournalbook #grow #lookinside #attitude #values #healing #bookstagram #journaling #bookquotes #evolve #higherconsciousness #bethebestyou
https://www.instagram.com/p/BoeU10bAjcG/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=1f66dva874tyx

Posted 20 weeks ago
<p>Practice gratitude…change your attitude. Volume II:Constant Companions #thesouldiscoveryjournalbook #soul #healing #selfhelp #mindfulness #challengeyourself #journaling #lookinside #bookstagram #grateful #gratitudejournal #bethechange #bookquotes <br/>
<a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BocMWb_gP8I/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=1p9v96samktma">https://www.instagram.com/p/BocMWb_gP8I/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=1p9v96samktma</a></p>

Practice gratitude…change your attitude. Volume II:Constant Companions #thesouldiscoveryjournalbook #soul #healing #selfhelp #mindfulness #challengeyourself #journaling #lookinside #bookstagram #grateful #gratitudejournal #bethechange #bookquotes
https://www.instagram.com/p/BocMWb_gP8I/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=1p9v96samktma

Posted 20 weeks ago

Honoring Sacrifice...Desiring Peace

November 18, 2017


Honoring Sacrifice...Desiring Peace

by Adriene Nicastro-Santos

The happy in Happy Memorial Day sometimes feels like such a mis-fitting holiday wish. Memorials tend to be inherently sad and the energy of these days can bring old, unhealed loss rushing to the surface.

Fortunately, through better understanding we can learn to celebrate loved ones who have passed across the veil. Our honoring, toasting, and loving promenade down memory lane helps us heal. And when can remember that they are free of a cumbersome body, ever surrounded by divine helpers and passed loved ones, we find rest knowing they are welcomed so lovingly Home.

I asked myself this morning, how do I offer a Happy Memorial Day with the mindset of peace, knowing how much I don't support war and conflict? How do I offer love to those suffering with loss, making sure to not ignore any residual unhealed loss in myself? Here it goes...
  • To all the young and the old, all the men and women, who have selflessly sacrificed for what they believed was important, valuable, and honorable, I thank you.
  • To those who suffered through conflict, strife, and war, I lovingly lift you into the consciousness of peace, compassion, and brotherhood/sisterhood. 
  • To all those still living in a war-torn landscape, I lovingly lift you in light and love that you come to know you no longer need to struggle and be in pain.
  • To all those who have passed in my life, I thank you for the lessons...what appears to be "bad" and what I see as "good", knowing all lessons are gifts for my highest good.
  • To all those still mourning loss in all its various and sundry forms, may you find solace, comfort, and peace knowing you are never alone and love is never, ever lost.
  • And to a world, seemingly consumed with fear and conflict, I lift all living things into the consciousness of peace and unity; that we grow to be a world not just free from war, but one that abides in oneness knowing that every stone cast creates an endless ripple. Let that stone be love
Please join us Sundays at 7:00 pm, Tuesdays at 8:00 pm and Thursdays at 7:30 pm for Global Healing Meditations. Keep an eye out for our live broadcasts, too when we are able.

Many blessings and joy on this holiday dedicated to remembering,
Adriene
 

Spiritual Healing: A Brief Glance

November 18, 2017


Spiritual Healing: A Brief Glance

by Adriene Nicastro-Santos

After many years of self-development and internal work to release the long-held pain of past traumas, I found myself still struggling. Something in traditional psychotherapy and classical introspection wasn't doing the trick. Something was missing. That was when I began to seriously study spiritual teachings and receive spiritual healing.

Now, mainstream healing trends are often relegated to a trip to the doctor and a prescription of little blue pills. The broader context of healing, in truth, encompasses so much more. Anything that helps us is healing, including our belief in healing itself (what science calls the placebo effect and spirituality calls faith).

When we arrive in the realm of 'spiritual healing', many  people decide to get off the bus and wave a pleasant, but skeptical goodbye.  So what is this illusive practice, steeped in mystery and shrouded for many in magic? Spiritual healing has a variety of avenues, from the laying on of hands, darshan, and shamanic ceremonies, to name a few. It is a gentle, peaceful process meant to hold those receiving in unconditional love. It is experiencing the crest of the mountain, a celebration of our holy nature, a witness to the Divine within another and ourselves.

Spiritual healing is sometimes very subtle, like a gentle rain that washes away the dust and debris with such care we barely notice. At other times, it's as though we witnessed the sun in all it's glory and radiance for the first time. What prepares us for such powerful transformation is the shedding of limiting beliefs...the beliefs that block us from receiving that which is divinely inspired. That is to say, self-development, serious introspection, counseling, and therapy, can open our mind and heart by helping us shed the hurts that keep us in a confined consciousness. Inner work can serve to prepare us for spiritual healing and spiritual healing can prepare us for more inner work and deeper healing.

The energetic component of spiritual healing happens as a channeling of divine energy through the healer, a conduit to the receiver. Witnessing the healee as the embodiment of Spirit in union with God, beyond all limitations, calls forth the perfection in which we all were created. The healing energy harkens to the light within to burn brightly to shine away pain on any level. Spiritual healing addresses all levels of our being - physical, mental, and emotional. As such, it enables us to heal whatever form our difficulties take, returning us to the Truth in which we were created. 

Many blessings,
Adriene
 

New World Declaration

November 18, 2017

New World Declaration

by Adriene Nicastro-Santos

The fourth of July has taken on different meaning for me this year in the wake of political, social, environmental, and economic unrest. We appear to be a country divided...divided by political views, by social injustice, on care for Mother Earth, and an economic rift steeped in lack. What we witness in the news, in communities across the country, in casual and intimate encounters, and in our own experiences with a vastly changing climate, breeds fear - fear of the future for ourselves, our families and loved ones, and our Mother.

Reflecting on this holiday, I returning to the words of our founding fathers...

In Congress, July 4, 1776,

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness. 

Seems as though we've strayed far from our long ago belief. And as we look at this famous statement of truth, we must even push past the appearance that half the population seems removed (women) and that slavery was still highly practiced. IF we shift to higher vision to really see "men" as humankind and add All Living Things - plant, animal, human of all shapes, sizes, genders, race, orientation - we embark on a journey that truly honors Life. While I realize this is a big if (big because we know the shortcomings of those "Declaration men", big because it is a huge leap to look beyond what seems to be), I encourage each of you to really hold to this as our original intent...an all encompassing vision.  This is our direction, our destiny. This is uplifting our consciousness out of the depths of the darkness that seems to surround our great divide and beckons us to give up our pain, suffering, lack, prejudice, judgments, and fear...once and for all.

So, in honor of the childhood memories that are burned in my brain, let's do a timely rewrite to the preamble of the Constitution that addresses the spirit of this well intended document:

We the people, in order to remember our perfect Union with one another beyond all limitation, establish Justice and insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense of Universal Grace by wrapping all in love and light, promote the general Welfare by supporting and valuing one another , and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and all life and our Prosperity by embracing God's abundance, so ordain and establish this New World constitution for the United States of America. 
 
Happy 4th and many blessings on your path,
Adriene
 

Honoring All Mothers

November 14, 2017


Honoring All Mothers

by Adriene Nicastro-Santos

To all you many mothers,

We wanted to extend a warm and loving mother's day wish to all mothers - biological mothers, step-mothers, adoptive mothers, pet mothers, den mothers... We know that there is much love and care that you give to those in your life. You have embarked upon a journey that has many twists and turns, joys and sorrows, hopes and dreams. The journey to give life, guiding and nurturing, and finally setting those offspring loose upon the world requires courage, wisdom, centeredness, patience, and love...to name a few. Lord knows, there are times that we feel totally absent of any tools, but somehow, those in our care make their way and emerge from the world exactly as they need to be.

As a mother, many times I have forgotten about myself in the process, so I personally encourage you to do something nice for yourself today - something nurturing, loving, and honoring all that encompasses caring for yourself physically, mentally, and emotionally. We must all remember that to be the best version of ourselves, we must be sure to take personal care seriously, otherwise our resources and reserves will be too depleted to truly be the best we are able.

Finally, we extend love, light, and peace to Mother Earth, who is life giving and nurtures us all. She needs our protection, gratitude, and prayers so that those who most profoundly affect her health also honor and care for her in the highest and best manner. Let us thank her for her sustaining, life-giving energy and honor the many forms of life she carries within her womb.

Please join us this evening at 7:00 pm to send her and all life upon her healing. Let us envision her being held lovingly in our arms in unity and wholeness with Universal Power, the creative Source within us and all things.

A Blessed Mother's Day, 
Adriene
 

Constant Evolution

November 14, 2017

Constant Evolution

by Adriene Nicastro-Santos

     Those of you who spend time with me in group or other venues have witnessed the struggle and profound lessons of the past months. On this journey of spiritual growth, witnessing the challenges of those who appear as our teachers can be frightening. But if we are a student of The Course in Miracles or A Course of Love, we know that teachers and students are relative terms. At times we clearly are one, at times the other, but always uncovering and becoming aware of exactly what is for our highest and best. 
     Sometimes a notion that the group facilitator or teacher should not be in a place to face challenges is what besets us, bringing the thoughts and worries about what's in store in our own future. Others may find relief that they are not alone in experiencing life's lessons.
     After so many years of study, I think I was surprised to find myself in a place of still getting to know Cosmic Force. And much like so many other lessons, I was not aware of how disconnected I felt from it until I emerged on the other side of the experience. How could it be that I felt like this? Well, we all create expectations, constructs, and superimposed belief systems on everything from times past. Cosmic Force, Universal Power, God is not exempt from this. In fact, God and our beliefs about God are reflected in everything we experience...everything. It would seem that all experiences are merely a silhouette or pale shadow of our experiences of God. 
     My current lessons profoundly reminded me that God is in everything, from the smallest molecule to the biggest building. Anything made of natural substances contains that Cosmic Energy. That which is man-made also contains the God-energy of it's creator. And we are all creators. How wondrous, varied, and colorful the faces of God. From the plants, the trees, and the animals...all have Cosmic Energy that we can interact with and collaborate with in a magical, intricate dance. And just when we are having a little row with our partner or conversation with ourselves, God is witness experiencing life through us as us. We are never, ever truly alone or without.

Many blessings on your path,
Adriene
 

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